Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that can lead to a sedentary lifestyle and a host of associated health problems. While there are a number of ways to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE) in the general population, there is no gold-standard method for predicting REE in people with chronic SCI. However, recent research has identified a number of potential predictors of REE in this population that could be used to develop more accurate prediction equations.

One of the most promising predictors of REE in people with chronic SCI is body composition. In a recent study, REE was found to be significantly correlated with both total body mass and fat-free mass in people with chronic SCI. This suggests that body composition may be a good predictor of REE in this population.

Another potential predictor of REE in people with chronic SCI is level of activity. In a small study, REE was found to be significantly higher in people with chronic SCI who were more active, as measured by self-reported physical activity levels. This suggests that level of activity may be a good predictor of REE in people with chronic SCI.

Finally, age has also been found to be a significant predictor of REE in people with chronic SCI. In a large study, REE was found to decrease with age in people with chronic SCI. This suggests that age may be a good predictor of REE in this population.

Taken together, these findings suggest that body composition, level of activity, and age may all be good predictors of REE in people with chronic SCI. These variables could be used to develop more accurate prediction equations for REE in this population.