Alcohol use and body mass index () have long been studied in relation to one another, with a growing body of evidence suggesting that there may be a sex-diverging association between the two. A meta-analysis of existing studies was recently conducted to further explore this potential relationship.

The meta-analysis included data from over 1.2 million participants from 17 different studies. The results of the analysis showed that there was a significant association between alcohol use and BMI, with the association being stronger for men than for women. Specifically, the analysis found that men who drank more alcohol had a higher BMI than men who drank less, while women who drank more alcohol had a lower BMI than women who drank less.

The authors of the meta-analysis suggest that this sex-diverging association between alcohol use and BMI may be due to differences in the way men and women metabolize alcohol. Men tend to metabolize alcohol more quickly than women, which could lead to a higher BMI in men who drink more. Additionally, the authors suggest that the association may be due to differences in the types of alcohol consumed by men and women. Men tend to consume more beer and spirits, which are higher in calories, while women tend to consume more wine, which is lower in calories.

Overall, the meta-analysis provides strong evidence for a sex-diverging association between alcohol use and BMI. This association may be due to differences in the way men and women metabolize alcohol and the types of alcohol consumed. Further research is needed to better understand the underlying mechanisms of this association and to determine how it may be used to inform public health interventions.